ROSEMERY: The Natural Herbal Medicine

ROSEMERY: The Natural Herbal Medicine

Medicinal use of Rosemery

 

Rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis
Mint Family (Lamiaceae)

 

From medieval times, rosemary  – a symbol of love and fidelity – is often worn in bridal wreaths and given to wedding guests. Rosemary is a bushy, aromatic evergreen shrub found all around the Mediterranean. Spikes are pale blue and lilac flowers bloom from spring to early summer. 

 

The Englishman, Sir Thomas More (1478-1535), wrote in the 16th century: “As for Rosemarine, I lett it run all over my garden walls, Not onlie because my bees love it, But because ’tis the herb, Sacred to remembrance And, therefore, to friendship. The flowers are gathered when they are in full bloom and then dried. The evergreen leaves can be collected at any time of the year. The leaves are scalded and then dried. Rosemary is used in infusions, liquid extracts and as an essetial oil. 

 

Rosemary’s esssential oils include: cineole,borneol, camphor, linalool, verbenol, flavonoids (diosmin), and rosemarinic acids. Thus, rosemary contains many active constituents. Its flavonoids are stimulant and anti-oxidant. Its phenols – in particular rosmarinic acid – are antiseptic and reduce inflammation. Its astringent tannnins fight infection, while rosmaricine has been shown to have both stimulant and analgesic properties. The plant’s volatile oil has a sharp, stimulating fragence and contains a range of active compounds including cineole and camphor.

 

Rosemary deserves a place in the medicine cabinet. Researchers show that rosemary increases circulation, reduce headaches, and fight bacterial and fungal infections (Rao & Nigam, 1970). German pharmacies sell rosemary ointment to rub on nerve and rheumatic pains and for heart problems. A traditional European treatemnt for those suffering from poor circulaiton due to illness or lack of exercise is to consume rosemary extracted into white wine. Rosemary improves food absorption by stimulating digestion and the liver, intestinal tract, and gallbladder. It is also used to inhibit kindney- and bladder-stone formation. It makes an antiseptic garble for sore throuths, gum problems, and canker sores. 

 

Reseachers belive that rosemarinic acid might even be a good treatment for septic shock (Tattjake). Researches from the Univeristy of Tübingen, in Germany, show that the essential oil is absorbed through the skin and into the blood system in a bath in about the same time as it would be through drinking a cup of rosemary tea. The original “Queen of Hungary’s Wather” was a secret formula said to be prepared by a hermit for the elderly Elizabeth, Queen of Hungary, in 1235. It not only cured her paralyzed limbs, it gave her such a beautiful complexion, a young man fell in love with her. Rosemary is added to baths and liniments to stimulate and warm the skin and relax muscles. Rosemary is found in hair shampoons and conditioners to decrease dandruff and stimulate as a tonic. In earlier times, the branches were used like hairbrushes. It has flovored tooth powders and toothpastes since medival days. Rosemary’s fragrance is said to prevent nightmares, and the smoke was inhaled for weakness of the brain. It is an ingredient in eau de cologne.

 

Rosemary is often eaten in Italy, where chefs are masters at cooking the herb. The classical Roman Easter dish, abbacchio, lamb, is flavored with rosemary. Rosemary is often used with peas, greens, meats, and eggs and is excellent with tofu. The French town of Narbonne is famous for its rosemary honey. Rosemary is easily grown from cuttings. Once rooted, plant in a warm, sheltered, sunny spot, ideally in well-drained neutral to alkaline sandy soil. Rosemary does not thrive in wet, cold areas, and will need shelter if the weather is generally cool. The essential oil should not be taken, and should not be used topically by pregnant or breastfeeding women, children or those with hypersenitive skin or a medical condition. If pregnant or breastfeeding, do not consume more rosemery than would normally be found in the diet. Do not take herb if anaemic, and avoid taking rosemary and iron supplements at the same time. The undiluted oil of rosemary should never be taken internally. 

 

Rosemarinus Officinalis: ORGANICALLY GROWN Rosemary by Vesna Podkrajac in Sydney, Australia.
PHOTO: Vesna Podkrajac
Rosemarinus Officinalis: ORGANICALLY GROWN Rosemary by Vesna Podkrajac in Sydney, Australia.
PHOTO: Vesna Podkrajac
Rosemarinus Officinalis: ORGANICALLY GROWN Rosemary by Vesna Podkrajac in Sydney, Australia.
PHOTO: Vesna Podkrajac

APA Reference

Podkrajac, V. (2017). Rosemary: The herb of remembrance. Mind Body Spirit World. Retrieved December 12, 2017, from http://mindbodyspiritworld.com/2017/12/12/rosemary-herb-remembrance.htm.



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